Dear spammer: Here’s to your lousy spelling

You have to hand it to spammers. They litter their messages with clues that scream, “Hey, stupid! Don’t click on this!”

Take the one above, which dropped into my inbox several times over the last few months.

All I had to do was click on a link and I’d “recieve” my “greeding” card.

Yup.

A while back, a spam message told me that the IRS was sitting around and thinking about how it could help me – me! – and promised a $420,25 tax refund. Yes, that’s what it said: $420,25.

All I had to do was reply to the message and tell the “IRS” my name, address and other pertinent information.

You’d think that if the IRS had a check made out to me that – no, with these messages you aren’t supposed to think.

The lesson for the rest of us is that details like good spelling and proper grammar provide credibility; details like fact-checking keep us from losing our bacon in a world awash in spam.

Details matter more than ever.

Of course, the IRS message did have a whiff of reality. It contained a vapid sentence that sounded so real that you could imagine it on a government or corporate brochure:

“Learn about our organization-from the day-to-day operations that touch your household to our strategic direction and plans for moving forward.”

Indeed!

Among the recent gracious offers of “On-Line Boner Meds” and an $800,000 bank draft for a mere $180, one benevolent chap promised to “halp” me so I’d never “loose” again at roulette.

My advice: You can’t loose if you don’t play.

And you can’t be scammed if you recognize the spam.

Thankfully, most spammers make it easy with their sloppiness.

The lesson for the rest of us is that details like good spelling and proper grammar provide credibility; details like fact-checking keep us from losing our bacon in a world awash in spam.

Details matter more than ever.

As for Spam, it’s wickedly delicious when served with a side of Python.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...