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It's all about thinking

A source emerges from hell, or somewhere thereabouts

Jesters of the world have long tweaked the noses of journalists.

Hugh Jassel, who apparently was one, caught the Lawrence Journal-World twice in his little joke. (I’ve posted one of them.)

Hugh’s cousin Haywood Jablome slipped undetected into the Fargo Forum late last year.

Now comes David Jacobson of Tartarus, who found his way into the University Daily Kansan earlier this month.

Presumably, the Kansan reporter and editors thought Tartarus was a sleepy little town somewhere in the far reaches of nowhere.

As Becky Howlett pointed out, though, Tartarus is the land beneath Hades in Greek mythology.

That makes Mr. Jacobson either a Jassel descendant or part of a demon horde that has escaped from the underworld.

Personally, I’d prefer that he wasn’t part of a demon horde. If he is, though, I highly recommend reading John Connolly’s book “The Gates,” in which tests of the Large Hadron Collider inadvertently open a portal for all sorts of nasty demons and, eventually, the Great Malevolence himself.

All of that would be quite nasty indeed if not for the spunk of a young boy named Samuel Johnson, who fights off the demons with a cricket bat, and for the idiocy of the demons themselves, who somehow seem related to Hugh Jassel, especially when they get a few drinks in them.

Then again, should the demon horde from Tartarus or thereabouts come tramping through your rose bushes, well … have a listen to this excerpt from “The Gates,” read by Jonathan Cake – and then run.

The Demonic Horde

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Tagged as: fact-checking, fake names, humor, Kansan

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